A balancing act

My sincere thanks go to Declutterbug for nominating my humble blog for an award. I’ve been so erratic with posts lately, I’m sure I don’t deserve such praise, but thank you so much for the nomination.

I’ve been living in Southampton for a month and I thought things would get easier after payday. But I have been scuppered with unforeseen expense that have forced me to constantly adjust my budget.

I now have a spread sheet detailing my food shopping lists for the next four weeks. They are all based on the system of rationing that I am so enchanted with. This scheme was organised by the best nutritional scientists of the age and their recommendations still correlate with healthy eating advice today. I bought my first allocation of weekly rations on Monday, but I’m already running into difficulties.

The main reason I return to wartime rationing is that it helps me to eat health food on a budget. I went to the beach yesterday and had a glorious time. Ice cream wasn’t rationed during the war, but was rarely available. Not healthy, not cost-efficient, but I still ate it.

Dried fruit and nuts was rationed as part of the points system, but how do you calculate the points value of a 30g snack pack?

My housemate bought 9 eggs as they were the cheapest to buy, but says she won’t use all of them within the “use by” date. They have become “house eggs” and I’m free to use however many I want. Surely no member of 1940s society would have turned down free eggs?

I am facing certain challenges whilst trying to stick with my rationing guidelines, but I think if I ensure I don’t eat more sweets than my ration, and stay within my money budget, I think this scheme will be beneficial overall.

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We’re having a cook-up

Since being in my new space and getting used to the new amenities, I have only spent fleeting time in the kitchen. But on my first day off, I knew it was high time for some serious bulk cooking. I needed to fill the fridge and freezer for the busy week ahead. I love spending time over the stove, stirring pots and throwing in various ingredients. It uses less power, ensures that no fresh produce goes to waste and saves time in the long run. Let’s just say, things got pretty inventive . . .

IMG_0324  These were my lunches for the past couple of days. It’s a concoction of savoury rice, taco-spiced onion and red pepper, and tuna. Sounds odd, but seriously tasty.

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Some times it’s necessary to have simple, cheap dinners occasionally so that I can afford really good meals at other times during the week. Although my supper on Thursday was simply mashed sweet potato and baked beans, it meant I had enough funds to buy necessary ingredients for a kickin’ chilli pot the next day.

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I will keep bulk cooking because it is the best way to cook on the cheap. Although I did get a reduced loaf of gluten-free bread this week, so it’s sandwiches aplenty for now. Nice to get a bit of variation going on.

Pros and cons

The best thing about living near the high street is the vast array of shops and not having to rely on one supermarket. The worst thing about living near the high street is the vast array of shops and not being able to rely on one supermarket.

            In my past life in Winchester, I would make a weekly pilgrimage to the giant Sainsbury’s nearby. I also knew what to expect, I could plan accordingly and I had to take or leave what was there. Occasionally, I would purchase items from stores in town or the farmer’s market, but most weeks, a single trip to Sainsbury’s was all I needed.

            Imagine my delight when I ventured into my new playground. That’s the best thing about living in a multicultural area, you get to purchase great food! There is also a charity shop every few paces and fantastic independent retailers selling everything under the sun. Stock changes on a daily basis and you’ll never know what’s going to be on offer at the greengrocer’s next. All of this is just a mere stone’s throw away, but that is where the conundrum lies. It’s far too tempting to pop into the shops when essentially, I don’t really need to. Products may be cheaper here, but I still have a budget.

            The first strategy I have employed is to stop carrying money. I had a snack, a water bottle and a fully charged mobile phone in my bag for work – there was no need for cash. This will stop me darting into shops at that perilous time of the day when I’ve just finished a shift and my tummy is rumbling.

            The next technique I plan to try is getting my cash out for the week and when it’s gone, it’s gone! I know several thrifty people who use this idea, and I’m going to try it out myself. That way, I can still enjoy touring the high street a couple of times a week, without overspending.

            It’s the balance of want and need and spend and save that I need to get accustomed to in this new environment. Got any tips? I would love to hear them.

Frugal Fridays #19

Moving to Southampton has been a costly affair. What with paying for the rental of the van, contributing to bills within the house and purchasing the necessary garments for my new job, my allowance for July has gone down shockingly during these past four days. But I have a wealth of frugal knowledge to call on, most of it gathered from a glorious selection of blogs. I know how to make the most of what I’ve got. So I was feeling confident as I stepped out to do my shopping with only £7.29 in my purse.

(I would like to throw in a disclaimer here to say I do have extra funds available if I ever did seriously run out of food. But this is a good chance to challenge myself.)

My first stop was the greengrocers, a new discovery of mine. The high street has an excellent greengrocers, stocked with all of the fruit and veg you could ask for. I made my selections carefully, making the most of the reduced section and came out with this haul all for £2.04! I handed over the exact change gleefully. I know I will become a regular customer at this shop.

My next destination was the huge Sainsbury’s at the end of the high street. Although it poses a menacing figure over the local shops and establishments, the area is still thriving. There is only one boarded up place along the entire road. So I didn’t feel too guilty about popping in to pick up some essentials.

I stocked up my cupboard with lots of Basics products. The rice packets are destined for lunch boxes, along with the tuna and sweetcorn. I know I can make good use out of everything I bought.

And one more trip on my thrifty shopping outing – to the library! I registered with the local library the day after I moved in and I’m so pleased I did. There wasn’t enough space to bring large supplies of books with me, so I’ll still be able to get my reading fix, for free!

In total, I spent £5.99. I came back with enough food to last me the week and two books to boot. A very successful outing, if I do say so myself.