Forging a new path

It’s Day One of my latest spending challenge and already, the goal posts have been moved. The Friday night takeaway is no longer applicable and I added the remaining change from my purse to the pot. So I set off to go shopping yesterday afternoon with £17.37 for the week.

I have become increasingly aware of the damaging nature of the meat industry and fear for the ecological future. I have decided to live as sustainably as I can, within my means. A book has triggered my new mindset, more about which in a future post. Even though my budget is minimal, I will be buying local, free-range, sustainable, organic produce where I can. Also, I’m avoiding waste like the plague. I’m making the most of every scrap, so I can make the most of higher quality products.

In Sainsbury’s on Sunday, I bought:

  • SO caramelised onion chutney
  • Tin foil
  • Reduced Black Farmer’s Daughter chipolata sausages
  • SO bananas (6)
  • Reduced Free From Gingerbread man (a snack for me and the chap whilst shopping)
  • Toothbrushes

IMG_0645

The reduced sausages were a great buy. The label reads “British Outdoor Bred Freedom Food Pork.” What more could one ask for? I bought foil, which is not environmentally friendly, but I’m not perfect, goodness no, I’m just trying to do my bit to help the planet. And yes, organic Fairtrade bananas are more expensive than regular Fairtrade, but not by much, and the whole idea is less food of a higher quality.

I then visited Waitrose to get my free coffee (Fairtrade!) and pick up supremely delicious milk. Less than 20p extra compared to Essentials, but I think the flavour is noticeable. Plus, it’s a donation to charity as Duchy is affiliated with the Prince’s Trust.

You might think I’m mad (the chap does!) spending more on food when I could get similar items cheaper. But it’s not just about the money. Personally, I would rather cut out television and instant internet access than nourishing food. It’s starting to feel illogical to live any other way.

I spent a total of £10.77 on my Sunday afternoon trip, as I also purchased a Basic chopping board with the intention of using it solely for meat. I have £6.60 in my purse to last until next Sunday.

IMG_0647

PS This is why eating up the stores is so much fun – my Sunday lunch; GF ciabatta from the freezer, drizzled with garlic oil, topped with the last of the Cornish cheddar, accompanied by carrot batons with the last of my previous jar of chutney and cucumber. Pudding was the last of the packs of finger cakes from last week’s afternoon tea. All raided from the stores but felt very decadent!

PPS: Today, Monday, I have spent £4.40 in the greengrocers and local co-operative. I have £2.20 left.

Pros and cons

The best thing about living near the high street is the vast array of shops and not having to rely on one supermarket. The worst thing about living near the high street is the vast array of shops and not being able to rely on one supermarket.

            In my past life in Winchester, I would make a weekly pilgrimage to the giant Sainsbury’s nearby. I also knew what to expect, I could plan accordingly and I had to take or leave what was there. Occasionally, I would purchase items from stores in town or the farmer’s market, but most weeks, a single trip to Sainsbury’s was all I needed.

            Imagine my delight when I ventured into my new playground. That’s the best thing about living in a multicultural area, you get to purchase great food! There is also a charity shop every few paces and fantastic independent retailers selling everything under the sun. Stock changes on a daily basis and you’ll never know what’s going to be on offer at the greengrocer’s next. All of this is just a mere stone’s throw away, but that is where the conundrum lies. It’s far too tempting to pop into the shops when essentially, I don’t really need to. Products may be cheaper here, but I still have a budget.

            The first strategy I have employed is to stop carrying money. I had a snack, a water bottle and a fully charged mobile phone in my bag for work – there was no need for cash. This will stop me darting into shops at that perilous time of the day when I’ve just finished a shift and my tummy is rumbling.

            The next technique I plan to try is getting my cash out for the week and when it’s gone, it’s gone! I know several thrifty people who use this idea, and I’m going to try it out myself. That way, I can still enjoy touring the high street a couple of times a week, without overspending.

            It’s the balance of want and need and spend and save that I need to get accustomed to in this new environment. Got any tips? I would love to hear them.